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What We Do

Different demands across the globe require suppliers and producers that are flexible, deliver excellent quality products, and will assist in all possible ways in different markets. Vickers Europe was established in 1990 and was born of a France-Netherland business that specialised primarily in the Construction market. As a result of a takeover in 2001, the company received a large product range of polyurea and polyurethane, adhesives, sealants and aerosols. Vickers a morrisparker brand

Vickers Europe was established in 1990 and was born of a France-Netherland business that specialised primarily in the Construction market.
Vickers prepared with the formula of Morris Parker of France.

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KEY POINTS
The House will send the impeachment article against former President Donald Trump to the Senate on Monday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said.
The action will start the process for the second Senate tr ... more ...

Covid live updates: U.S. hospitalizations fall to pre-Christmas levels; Walmart expands vaccinations
This is CNBC’s live blog covering all the latest news on the coronavirus outbreak. This blog will be updated throughout the day as the news breaks.
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XTX Markets, a tiny algorithmic trading firm that has taken Wall Street by storm, is searching for some exceptional minds.

The start-up is holding an online contest to find up to five new data scientists. Aspiring quants can split $100,000 in prize ... more ...

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Reviewing trades offers the opportunity to unpack the impact of random probability upon a sequence of trading events. An extremely simplified view of probability theory relative to trading goes something like this: A prolonged sequence of futures (or FX, equities, cryptos – pick your poison) trades with a fixed $1000 profit target and a fixed risk of $1000 (normalized for underlying trends) should produce profits in 50% of the trades. A net loss would occur over time due to trading fees. A prolonged sequence of futures trades with a fixed $2000 profit target and fixed risk of $1000 risk (normalized for underlying trends) should produce profits in approximately 33% of the trades. I would have a “killer” trading program if I could achieve a 50% win rate with a 2:1 win-size/loss-size ratio. A prolonged sequence of futures trades with a fixed $4000 profit target and fixed risk of $1000 risk (normalized for underlying trends) should produce profits in approximately 20% of the trades. Just imagine how profitable this profile would be if only 1/3rd of trades scored a win. Many traders only enter trades with a profit/risk ratio of 3:1. I understand the concept behind this – although I do not pay much attention to profit-potential/risk ratios in my own trading because I move my stop aggressively even though I may hold fast to a target. Active and aggressive trade management DRAMATICALLY alters the probability calculus. While the math is complex, think of it this way: My five year ratio of avg. profit size to avg. loss size is 3.8 to 1 My five year Profit Factor (PF) is 5.1 IMO, the PF is a better metric to reflect the projected ratio of win-size/loss-size for the purpose of understanding the impact of random probability. A 5.1 metric is the rough equivalent of rolling the number 1 on a six-sided die (the probability is 1/6 or 16.6%). It is interesting to note that this percentage figure is similar to the percent of trading events that tend to put in my bottom line in most years. Coincidence? No. Random probability theory applies best to the “law of large numbers.” Over a shorter series of events just about anything can happen. The point of this discussion is that thinking of trading in terms of “win-rate” over an extended period of time is a meaningless metric. I encourage traders to investigate a deeper understanding of the calculus of trading. My three “take-aways” from this discussion are: 1. Avoid using simplistic performance metrics such as “win-rate” to understand the dynamics of a trading approach/program. 2. Trade identification (the “signal”) is far less important than risk and trade management. 3. Protecting one’s pile of chips is job #1. All approaches to market speculation run into losing streaks. Things will eventually get sorted out as long as the pile of chips remains mostly intact.

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All our products are produced to high quality standards. A core group of raw material suppliers and laboratories help us excel in innovative products.

All our products are produced to high quality standards. A core group of raw material suppliers and laboratories help us excel in innovative products.

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